WEDNESDAY WORKFACTS You May Not Know

  • People who don’t take office politics seriously are more successful and efficient at work.
  • Employees who have more control over the layout and design of their workspace are healthier and happier in the office.
  • When office temperatures are low (68 degrees), employees make 44% more errors and are less productive than when temperatures are warmer (77 degrees).
  • Scientists note that employees should keep working until the age of 80, but that they should only work 25 hours a week for optimal productivity.
  • Procrastinating a project for work can increase focus and efficiency.
  • Multitasking at work can drop a person’s IQ by ten points, which is equivalent to losing a night of sleep and twice the effect of smoking marijuana.
  • Younger workers in the United States are injured at twice the rate of older workers. They are also at higher risk for car accidents at work due to less driving experience, lower use of seatbelts, and being more distracted.
  • While working past retirement age often has positive effects, such as a sense of purpose and inclusion in social networks, older workers are often discriminated against.
  • Early hunter-gatherers had more leisure time than those who live and work in a modern capitalist or agrarian society.
  • The Industrial Revolution allowed people to work longer and year-round. Labor was no longer tied to the season or natural lighting.
  • In the mid 2000s, the Netherlands became the first industrialized country to drop its work week hours to below 30 hours.
  • The word “work” is from the Proto-Indo-European word *werg, meaning “to do.”
  • The word “employ” is from the Latin implicare, meaning to “enfold, involve, associate.”
  • The word “boss” is from the Dutch baas, meaning “a master.”
  • Over a lifetime, the average person spends about 90,000 hours at work.
  • Before the age of 40, Americans hold between seven to eight different jobs.
  • Every year, the average American spends over 100 hours commuting.
  • The average office chair with wheels travels about eight miles per year.