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WEDNESDAY WORKFACT: Unemployment in the U.S. and Illinois

The table in the article ranks the 50 states of the United States by unemployment rate. In July 2017, about 2.2% of the North Dakota population was unemployed, the lowest among the states; the highest unemployment rate was recorded in Alaska, at 7.0%. Illinois has the 14th highest unemployment rate, at 4.4%, or 183.3 million. In May of 2016, Illinois had the highest unemployment rate in the nation, at 6.6%.

A person is considered unemployed if they have no job and are currently looking for a job and available to work. The U.S. unemployment rate varies unemployment-rateacross states. Nation-wide unemployment was 4.4 percent as of April 2017 and has remained almost the same over the last year. Unemployment can be affected by various factors including economic conditions and global competition. During economic prosperity unemployment rates generally decrease and during times of recession, rates increase.

Many Americans believe that job creation should be one of the most important priorities set by the government. Since 1990, the country’s unemployment rate reached a low of 4 percent in 2000 and a high in 2010 at 9.6 percent. It has been argued that the definition of unemployment is too narrow and does not include some groups of people, such as the “underemployed” and the “hidden unemployed”, which account for about 3.3 million Americans.

WORKFACT WEDNESDAY: 82% of Job Seekers Are Frustrated With Automated Recruiting

by Aliah D. Wright for SHRM online

A new report reveals that 82 percent of job seekers are frustrated with an overly automated recruiting experience. It’s especially true for candidates who apply for jobs online and never hear back from potential employers about the status of their applications.

Randstad US, based in Atlanta and one of the largest national staffing and HR service organizations, released the report in August. About 1,200 respondents from the U.S. were surveyed by . While most candidates found value in technology, they said they are frustrated when it supplants the human aspect of the recruiting process.

The report also found:

  • 95 percent said technology should be used to assist the recruiting experience, not replace it.
  • 87 percent said technology has made looking for a job more impersonal.
  • 82 percent said the ideal interaction with a company is one where innovative technologies are used behind the scenes and come second to personal, human interaction.

“The findings reinforce what we’ve believed for quite some time, that successful talent acquisition lies at the intersection of technology and human touch,” said Randstad North America CEO Linda Galipeau. “If done correctly, the right combination of personal interaction with the power of today’s intelligent machines can create an experience that is inherently more human.”

You can read more at SHRM online.

WEDNESDAY WORKFACT: The Basic Facts of Work

At 20 I wanted to save the world. Now I’d be satisfied just to save part of my salary.
– H. G. Hutcheson

When you were growing up, did anyone ever tell you the facts about work? Things like why we all have to work and why it takes most people 40+ years to be able to retire? Or were you left to discover them on your own?

The facts below will help you start looking beyond the next payday and maybe find a few good reasons to take a good, hard look at how much you love what you do for a living.

1 – The reality is that most people have to work.

Unless you inherited a trust fund or recently won the lottery — you need a way to earn money to buy the necessities and luxuries of life.

2 – If no one goes to work, the world stops.

If farmers don’t work, no one eats. If teachers don’t work, no one learns. If nurses and doctors don’t work, no one is cured. For our modern world to work, someone still has to fix the phone lines, stock the grocery shelves and refill the ATMs. So even if everyone won the lottery tomorrow, most of us would still need to show up for work.

3 – You will spend at least 60% of your life working.

That includes the time you spend at work, as well as all the time you spend preparing for it, looking for it, commuting to it and recovering from it on the weekend.

4. Even with a well-paying job, you will probably still have to work for a majority of your life.

Most people live at the highest level their income will allow. (Simply put, they spend everything that they make.) And since most people also want to live at the same level after they retire, it takes roughly 40 years to save enough to comfortably retire.

5 – You cannot earn a high income just by showing up on time and doing an average job.

People who do average jobs get paid average wages. Doing a good job earns you a good salary. But to get paid a high income, you need to offer your employer or clients work they value highly. Exactly what that is (and what you really get paid for) is not always listed in your job description.

See next week’s Workfact Wednesday for five more basic facts about work from the blog, Manifest Your Potential.com.

WEDNESDAY WORKFACT: Onboarding Employees for Success

{by Christine Marino at http://blog.clickboarding.com/employee-engagement-onboarding-impacts-performance}

 

Employee engagement is a perpetual hot-button topic for employers as research have shown that as many as 70% of employees are disengaged at work. This means less productivity for employees and endless frustration for you and your management team. The best way to create a culture that is engaged and happy is by engaging your employees as soon as possible — during the onboarding process.

Use Culture to Propel Employee Engagement

There’s more to early onboarding than having legal paperwork completed by their first day. Almost 50% of potential employees explore company materials (like their careers website) to get a feel for the company’s values and cultural fit. For employers, this means “cultural onboarding” needs to start well before an employee starts working. Provide your new hires with digital information as part of their onboarding material. Be sure to explain what your company is about and contextualize their job within its larger vision. This gives your hire a better idea of the company they’re about to work for, easing them into the job.

Be Proactive and Smile

You’ve told your new hire where their office is and what events go on the company calendar… now what? What do candidates want from their onboarding? According to a recent survey by BambooHR, 23% of new hires who left their jobs within six months of starting wanted clearer guidelines about their responsibilities. 17% felt “a friendly smile or helpful co-worker would have made all the difference.” The message? When it comes to onboarding, a little friendliness goes a long way.

Better Performance Through Extended Onboarding

Research shows that employee onboarding programs increase performance by 11%. Now imagine what you could do if you truly engaged your employees before day one. The more you teach your employees before they get into the on-the-job training, the faster they’ll be able to do their job.

When performance is taken into consideration, every day counts. Even day-one.  Many companies have a probationary period, so understanding an employee’s growth from the first day is a crucial predictor to their performance in the future. The average time for a professional employee to reach full productivity is about 20 weeks. 26 weeks for those at the executive level. So no matter how minor it may be, every little thing you teach an employee through onboarding will cut down on this time, meaning higher performance and better work sooner.

It’s simple: if you want your employees to engage with your company culture, have a better onboarding experience, and grow into their own as employees more quickly, you need to engage with them before and throughout the onboarding process. Even something as simple as a positive attitude can go a long way. If you engage your new hires during onboarding, you’re setting your employees up for better performance and a better experience.

 

WEDNESDAY WORKFACT: How Americans Use Their Time

According to the American Time Use Survey from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, which used polling data to illustrate a day in the life for Americans by age, gender, and education. Here’s the information from one of the seven charts available in the survey report.

Hours Spent in an Average Work Day for Employed Adults Ages 25 to 54 with Children:

Working & related activities   8.6

Sleeping   7.6

Leisure & sports   2.6

Caring for others   1.2

Eating & drinking   1.1

Household activities   1.1

Other   1.8

{From an article in The Atlantic magazine online.}