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WEDNESDAY WORKFACT: Which occupations are expected to see greatest growth?

Much of U.S. job growth over the past 35 years has been in occupations that require higher levels of education, training and experience,jobs according to a recently released Pew Research Center report. And based on our analysis of official government job-growth projections, that trend seems likely to continue.

Employment in occupations requiring average to above-average levels of preparation – a metric that combines formal education, on-the-job training and prior related experience – is expected to grow 7.9% between 2014 and 2024, according to the federal Bureau of Labor Statistics. That equates to nearly 6 million of the 9.7 million jobs predicted to be added over that time. Employment in occupations requiring below-average preparation, on the other hand, is projected to grow by only 5.1%, or the equivalent of about 3.7 million jobs. (The BLS projects overall 2014-24 job growth at 6.5%.)

The differences in projected growth were even more pronounced when looking at social skills, which Pew Research Center defines as encompassing interpersonal skills, written and spoken communication skills, and management or leadership skills. Employment in occupations that require average to above-average levels of such social skills is projected to grow by 8.1%, versus just 4.4% growth for occupations requiring below-average levels of those skills.

Click here to read the full Pew Research report

WEDNESDAY WORKFACT: Job Satisfaction High, but Employees Not Content with Pay or Workplace Trust Level

 CHICAGO—Nearly 9 in 10 employees say they’re satisfied overall with their jobs, with workers noting that respectful treatment of employees—at all levels—is the leading contributor to satisfaction, according to the Society for Human Resource Management’s (SHRM’s) Employee Job Satisfaction and Engagement Survey.

Women—more than men—say respectful treatment at work is a very important component of job satisfaction. Millennials—more than members of Generation X—say they are very satisfied with the level of respect at work. Employees who aren’t in management are far less likely than executives to be satisfied with the respect shown to all workers.

“Fairness and transparency are significant themes that repeatedly appeared throughout the top job satisfaction contributors and employee engagement,” said Evren Esen, SHRM director of workforce analytics. “This indicates the importance of these concepts when creating a workplace culture that thrives and inspires continuous success.”

The survey, released April 24, polled 600 randomly selected U.S. employees in December 2016. The survey has a margin of error of plus or minus 2.5 percentage points.

Click here to read the full article and survey results from the Society of Human Resource Management

WEDNESDAY WORKFACT: Interesting Hiring Statistics from Inc. Magazine

1. The 5 things job seekers take into account before accepting a job offer,

from most to least important, are: 1) salary and compensation, 2) career growth opportunities, 3) work-life balance, 4) location/commute, and 5) company culture and values.

2. 79 percent of job seekers use social media in their job search

The figure increases to 86 percent of  job seekers who are in the first 10 years of their careers.

3. Nearly 2 in 3 employees say their employer does not–or does not know how to–use social media to promote job openings

And 3 in 4 say their employer does not–or does not know how to–promote their employment brand on social media.

4. The 3 things that most matter to Millennials in the companies they work for:

1) growth opportunities, 2) retirement benefits, and 3) work culture.

5. Most Millennials (64%) would rather make $40K a year at a job they love than $100K a year at a job they think is boring

And nearly 80 percent of Millennials look at people and culture fit with prospective employers, followed by career potential.

6. 69 percent of job seekers would not take a job with a company that has a bad reputation–even if unemployed

And 84 percent would consider leaving their current job if offered a job by a company with an excellent reputation.

7. Increasing employee engagement investments by 10 percent can increase company profits by $2,400 per employee per year

And 70 percent of employees who lack confidence in the abilities of senior leadership are not fully engaged.

{from Inc. magazine online}

WEDNESDAY WORKFACT: Pay vs. Fun on the Job

fact graphic fun v pay

WORKFACT WEDNESDAY: Women in the Global Work Force

Even as globalization has brought millions of women into the paid labor market, the number of women in the workforce is far behind that of men. Gender inequalities have also concentrated women at the bottom of the global value chain — in the lowest paid jobs, in piece-rate, subcontracted work, and insecure forms of self-employment, with little or no access to decent work and social protection. Women are half the world’s potential and unleashing it requires access to decent, good-quality paid work as well as gender-sensitive policies and regulations, such as adequate parental leave and flexible hours.

The economics make sense, too: If women played an identical role in labor markets to that of men, as much as $28 trillion, or 26 percent, could be added to the global annual Gross Domestic Product by 2025.