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The Hire Solution’s Temp of the Month: Karyn Miller

employee month 3

Temp 0f the Month Karyn Miller with Vince Clemente, owner of E.R.C. Delivery Services  where Karyn works as Clemente’s assistant.

Congratulations to The Hire Solution’s

August Temp of the Month, Karyn Miller.

The hot days of August may slow down some employees, but not Karyn! She brings her energy-producing smile and sunny disposition into the E.R.C. Delivery Services office every day. Her awesome work ethic, attention to detail and absolute delight when asked to roll up her sleeves and tackle a new challenge, makes her our hands-down choice for our Temp of the Month.

Thanks, Karyn, and keep up the great work!

WEDNESDAY WORKFACT: The Basic Facts of Work

At 20 I wanted to save the world. Now I’d be satisfied just to save part of my salary.
– H. G. Hutcheson

When you were growing up, did anyone ever tell you the facts about work? Things like why we all have to work and why it takes most people 40+ years to be able to retire? Or were you left to discover them on your own?

The facts below will help you start looking beyond the next payday and maybe find a few good reasons to take a good, hard look at how much you love what you do for a living.

1 – The reality is that most people have to work.

Unless you inherited a trust fund or recently won the lottery — you need a way to earn money to buy the necessities and luxuries of life.

2 – If no one goes to work, the world stops.

If farmers don’t work, no one eats. If teachers don’t work, no one learns. If nurses and doctors don’t work, no one is cured. For our modern world to work, someone still has to fix the phone lines, stock the grocery shelves and refill the ATMs. So even if everyone won the lottery tomorrow, most of us would still need to show up for work.

3 – You will spend at least 60% of your life working.

That includes the time you spend at work, as well as all the time you spend preparing for it, looking for it, commuting to it and recovering from it on the weekend.

4. Even with a well-paying job, you will probably still have to work for a majority of your life.

Most people live at the highest level their income will allow. (Simply put, they spend everything that they make.) And since most people also want to live at the same level after they retire, it takes roughly 40 years to save enough to comfortably retire.

5 – You cannot earn a high income just by showing up on time and doing an average job.

People who do average jobs get paid average wages. Doing a good job earns you a good salary. But to get paid a high income, you need to offer your employer or clients work they value highly. Exactly what that is (and what you really get paid for) is not always listed in your job description.

See next week’s Workfact Wednesday for five more basic facts about work from the blog, Manifest Your Potential.com.

THROWBACK THURSDAY: First U.S. Census

1790 Federal Census

1790 Federal Census

{excerpted from the U.S. Census Bureau website}

The first census began on August 2, 1790, more than a year after the inauguration of President Washington and shortly before the second session of the first Congress ended. Congress assigned responsibility for the 1790 census to the marshals of the U.S. judicial districts under an act which, with minor modifications and extensions, governed census taking through 1840. The law required that every household be visited, that completed census schedules be posted in “two of the most public places within [each jurisdiction], there to remain for the inspection of all concerned…” and that “the aggregate amount of each description of persons” for every district be transmitted to the president.

census sign

Eight reliefs on the east side of the U.S. Department of Commerce building, carved of limestone by James Earle Fraser, depict the eight bureaus that fell under the jurisdiction of the Department of Commerce in 1931.  Included are the Census Bureau (above), Coast and Geodetic Survey, the Bureau of Mines, the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Commerce, the Bureau of Navigation, the Bureau of Aeronautics, the Bureau of Steamboat Inspection, and the Patent Office.

The six inquiries in 1790 called for the name of the head of the family and the number of persons in each household of the following descriptions:

  • Free White males of 16 years and upward (to assess the country’s industrial and military potential)
  • Free White males under 16 years
  • Free White females
  • All other free persons
  • Slaves

Under the general direction of Thomas Jefferson, the Secretary of State, marshals took the census in the original 13 States, plus the districts of Kentucky, Maine, and Vermont, and the Southwest Territory (Tennessee). Both Washington and Jefferson expressed skepticism over the final count, expecting a number that exceeded the 3.9 million inhabitants counted in the census.

WEDNESDAY WORKFACT: Onboarding Employees for Success

{by Christine Marino at http://blog.clickboarding.com/employee-engagement-onboarding-impacts-performance}

 

Employee engagement is a perpetual hot-button topic for employers as research have shown that as many as 70% of employees are disengaged at work. This means less productivity for employees and endless frustration for you and your management team. The best way to create a culture that is engaged and happy is by engaging your employees as soon as possible — during the onboarding process.

Use Culture to Propel Employee Engagement

There’s more to early onboarding than having legal paperwork completed by their first day. Almost 50% of potential employees explore company materials (like their careers website) to get a feel for the company’s values and cultural fit. For employers, this means “cultural onboarding” needs to start well before an employee starts working. Provide your new hires with digital information as part of their onboarding material. Be sure to explain what your company is about and contextualize their job within its larger vision. This gives your hire a better idea of the company they’re about to work for, easing them into the job.

Be Proactive and Smile

You’ve told your new hire where their office is and what events go on the company calendar… now what? What do candidates want from their onboarding? According to a recent survey by BambooHR, 23% of new hires who left their jobs within six months of starting wanted clearer guidelines about their responsibilities. 17% felt “a friendly smile or helpful co-worker would have made all the difference.” The message? When it comes to onboarding, a little friendliness goes a long way.

Better Performance Through Extended Onboarding

Research shows that employee onboarding programs increase performance by 11%. Now imagine what you could do if you truly engaged your employees before day one. The more you teach your employees before they get into the on-the-job training, the faster they’ll be able to do their job.

When performance is taken into consideration, every day counts. Even day-one.  Many companies have a probationary period, so understanding an employee’s growth from the first day is a crucial predictor to their performance in the future. The average time for a professional employee to reach full productivity is about 20 weeks. 26 weeks for those at the executive level. So no matter how minor it may be, every little thing you teach an employee through onboarding will cut down on this time, meaning higher performance and better work sooner.

It’s simple: if you want your employees to engage with your company culture, have a better onboarding experience, and grow into their own as employees more quickly, you need to engage with them before and throughout the onboarding process. Even something as simple as a positive attitude can go a long way. If you engage your new hires during onboarding, you’re setting your employees up for better performance and a better experience.

 

WEDNESDAY WORKFACT: How Americans Use Their Time

According to the American Time Use Survey from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, which used polling data to illustrate a day in the life for Americans by age, gender, and education. Here’s the information from one of the seven charts available in the survey report.

Hours Spent in an Average Work Day for Employed Adults Ages 25 to 54 with Children:

Working & related activities   8.6

Sleeping   7.6

Leisure & sports   2.6

Caring for others   1.2

Eating & drinking   1.1

Household activities   1.1

Other   1.8

{From an article in The Atlantic magazine online.}