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TIP TUESDAY

TIP TUESDAY: 8 Differences You Need to Know About Generation Z vs. Millennials

The next generation hungry to enter the workplace is Generation Z. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, Generation Z (the post-Millennial generation) makes up 25% of the population. (See, Who Is Generation Z? 4 Big Ways They Will Be Different, to learn more.)

Sixty-two percent of Generation Zers anticipate challenges working with Baby Boomers and Generation Xers vs. only 5% who anticipate challenges working with Millennials.

Companies with a firm understanding of the expectations and preferences of the emerging generation will be well-equipped to attract the next generation of talent, maximize their potential, alleviate the inevitable cross-generational challenges, and capitalize on cognitive diversity through a generationally diverse workforce.

Here are eight key differences you need to know:

1. Realistic vs. Optomistic

Seventy-seven percent of Generation Zers expect to work harder than previous generations.

Millennials became optimistic thanks to their encouraging Baby Boomer parents and growing up in a time of prosperity and opportunity. Generation Zers will be realistic thanks to their skeptical and straight-shooting Generation X parents and growing up in a recession. According to Pew Charitable Trusts, during the Great Recession, the median net worth of Generation Z’s parents fell by nearly 45%.

2. Independent vs. Collaborative

Seventy-one percent of Generation Zers said they believe the phrase “if you want it done right, then do it yourself.”

When given the option to arrange a group of desks, Millennials would opt for a collaborative arrangement and assemble the desks into a circle. Generation Z will be more competitive with their colleagues and will harness a do-it-yourself mentality at work. In fact, 69% of Generation Zers would rather have their own work space than share it with someone else.

3. Digital Natives vs. Digital Pioneers

Forty percent of Generation Zers said that working Wi-Fi was more important to them than working bathrooms.

According to Pew Research, only 14% of U.S. adults had access to the Internet in 1995, but by 2014, 87% had access. Millennials were pioneers in the digital age. They witnessed the introduction and rise of social media, instant messaging, smartphones, search engines, and the mobile revolution. Generation Z did not witness these innovations, but rather, they were born into it. Ubiquitous connectivity, highly curated global information, on-demand video, and 24/7 news cycles are native to Generation Z.

4. Private vs. Public

Seventy percent of Generation Zers would rather share personal information with their pet than with their boss.

As digital pioneers, Millennials explored (and in some cases exploited) social media and made public their thoughts, opinions, and every noteworthy or menial life update. With safety and security top of mind, Generation Zers will be much more calculated and/or selective with the information they share online. For example, Generation Z gravitated to Snapchat because of the time-bound content that won’t live online forever like a Tweet or Facebook post would.

5. Face-to-Face vs. Digital Only

Seventy-four percent of Generation Z prefer to communicate face-to-face with colleagues.

Millennials pioneered many of the digital communication tools (e.g., texting, instant messaging, Slack) that have made the workplace more efficient and effective but, some would argue, less personable. Equipped with their experience communicating using full sight, sound, and motion over Skype®, FaceTime, Snapchat, etc., Generation Z is positioned as the ideal generation to finally strike the right balance between online and offline workplace communications.

6. On Demand Learning vs. Formally Educated

Seventy-five percent of Generation Z say there are other ways of getting a good education than by going to college, according to Sparks & Honey.

Millennials are questioning if their large student debt was worth it, especially considering that 44% of recent college grads are employed in jobs not requiring degrees, and one in eight recent college grads are unemployed. Generation Z will explore education alternatives. They will pursue on-demand or just-in-time learning solutions, like how-to YouTube tutorials, or will seek employers that offer robust on-the-job and development training.

6. Role-Hopping vs. Job-Hopping

Seventy-five percent of Generation Z would be interested in a situation in which they could have multiple roles within one place of employment.

Growing up in fast times and coming of age in an on-demand culture, Millennials have little patience for stagnation, especially when it comes to their careers. Generation Z won’t want to miss out on any valuable experience and will want to flex their on-demand learning muscle by trying out various roles or projects (e.g., marketing, accounting, human resources) inside of the organization.

8. Golden Citizen vs. Global Spectator

Fifty-eight percent of adults worldwide aged 35+ agree that “kids today have more in common with their global peers than they do with adults in their own country.”

Millennials were considered the first global generation because they shared similar characteristics and values across borders, and they were able to view significant global events in real time. However, Generation Z interacts with their global peers with greater fluidity than any other generation. As more of the world comes online, geographies will continue to shrink, causing Generation Z to view themselves as global citizens.

Ryan Jenkins is an internationally recognized Millennial and Generation Z keynote speaker, Inc.com columnist, and author of The Millennial Manual: The Complete How-To Guide to Manage, Develop, and Engage Millennials at Work.

TIP TUESDAY: 5 Lies to Watch For When Hiring

A survey from Right Management reports that the cost of a bad hire can range from one to five times the salary of the individual. According to background screening leader HireRight, job seekers very often exaggerate, falsify credentials and outright lie on their job applications, especially in today’s competitive job market.

Thus, the chances of hiring the wrong person escalate. The prevalence of candidates lying on job applications and resumes, if not outright fraud, at the very least provides reason for small businesses to conduct comprehensive background checks.

Here are five of the most popular lies told by job candidates that employers should watch out for:

1. Exaggerating dates of past employment

As many as 34 percent of all resumes include discrepancies related to previous employment. Candidates often stretch the truth to cover gaps in their work history they may not want to explain — like the job seeker who extended his employment dates to cover a six month jail sentence! Sometimes discrepancies are honest mistakes, but employers should always verify employment dates.

2. Falsifying the degree or credential earned

There is roughly a 20 percent discrepancy rate in education qualifications provided by candidates. Often a resume will tout a degree when a candidate only took some classes, or exaggerate a major so the candidate appears more qualified for the job. Other candidates forge diplomas, claim degrees earned by family members or purchase degrees from diploma mills. The latter can be very difficult to identify, but knowledgeable background checking firms compile detailed databases of known diploma mills so frauds can be identified.

3. Inflating salary or title

It’s hardly surprising that a candidate might exaggerate these important facts to get a better job or a higher salary. That’s why companies typically contact previous employers to verify positions held by the candidate. Salary verification can be more difficult since many companies will not reveal this information. In such cases, asking the candidate for previous W-2 forms as proof is a wise step.

4. Concealing a criminal record

The most serious reason companies must perform background checks is to maintain a safe workplace. Roughly 11 percent of all background checks return a criminal record. Disturbingly, criminals are most attracted to companies where they know they will not be checked, therefore smaller businesses may be a target. Criminal applicants often try to avoid detection through nondisclosure or by changing details such as the spelling of their names or dates of birth.

5. Hiding a drug habit

Since 42 percent of Americans admit to using an illegal drug in their lifetime, screening candidates for drug use is a wise idea for small businesses. Drug users go to great lengths to beat these tests — such as adulterating urine samples — but today’s drug tests are increasingly sophisticated and can identify true positives and negatives despite the attempts of those trying to cover up drug use.

{by John Reese, HireRight, as featured in business know-how online}

TIP TUESDAY: The Secret to a Great Resume

Let’s be honest: the job hunt can feel excruciatingly painful—and intimidating. Sure, your Linkedin profile could be airtight, your references flawless. But if your resume bombs, so does your chance at acing your interview. On top of that, hiring managers only spend about six seconds on a resume—research says so!—which makes creating the perfect one even more crucial. What is the typical job seeker to do?

Forget everything you thought you knew about resumes, including summaries and volunteer experience. According to experts, the secret to a great resume lies in the results.

Here’s what they mean: Listing your accomplishments on your resume with adjectives like “detail-oriented” or “self-motivated” might seem impressive to you. But odds are the employer won’t believe it until you prove your worth with numbers.

“If you want to make that indelible first impression on a hiring manager, you must show movement and real progress, and quantify your accomplishments with real, hard data,” Brian de Haaff, CEO of Aha!, wrote for Huffington Post. “Your results-focused resume will present a more accurate snapshot of who you are and what you can do—and clear the way for others to see that too.”

Take, for example, a descriptor like “Successfully trained the customer success team to improve customer communications.” Although the task itself sounds impressive, de Haaff suggests trying this instead: “Created 25 template responses and trained the customer success team, reducing average response time to under two hours.”

See the difference? According to de Haaff, the second descriptor provides a clearer picture of the direct impact you made on the company. Plus, quantifiable achievements do more than spice up your resume. Regardless of whether you’re a new grad or an experienced job hunter, they also tell a story about your past success, work ethic, and credibility, de Haaff says. And for employers, that detail can make or break your chances of landing the all-important interview (not to mention the job).

{from Reader’s Digest}

TIP TUESDAY: Corporate Culture Key to Attracting and Retaining Top Tech Talent, Says Survey

More than any other concern as it relates to hiring and retention, finding and hiring top tech talent keeps executives up at night—more than keeping the team they have in place and more than staying competitive with regard to salary and bonuses. According to the Harris Allied Tech Hiring and Retention Survey for 2017, half of all executives report that this is their biggest worry and that number has continued to grow by 11% in the last 3 years alone.

So what are executives doing to attract top tech talent? While being able to offer excellent compensation and benefit packages were most often cited as important recruiting tactics, being able to attract new employees with an amazing corporate culture or a company’s unique industry position ranked as the next most important strategies. An environment that is creative, inspiring, and fun (63.4%); being industry-leading and innovative (54.8%); and having the chance to work on interesting projects (51.6%) were cited most often as contributing to an exceptional corporate culture.

Corporate culture also plays a critical role in employee attrition. Nearly 26% of survey respondents said that people left their company for more exciting opportunities and the chance to work with new technology; another 16.7% said they thought it was because their corporate culture was very challenging. Competitive compensation and benefits packages always play a role, too, with another 19.2% citing that as a reason people had left the firm.

So what do executives feel they should be doing, or doing better, to attract and retain top tech talent? Of the 120 executives surveyed, the answers were fairly evenly split among improving professional development opportunities, increasing employee compensation, improving corporate culture and employee morale, and improving benefits, vacation, and paid time off (PTO) time.

Among the other key findings of the Harris Allied Tech Hiring and Retention Survey are:

  • Social media plays an important role in a company’s recruitment strategy, said 86.7% of those surveyed.
  • Offering both competitive compensation packages and outstanding benefits packages were cited most often as important (ranging from slightly to extremely) as a recruitment strategy. Offering employees the opportunity to telecommute came in as a close second.
  • On 2016 year-end bonuses, 35% said that their bonuses would be 1% to 5% higher than last year’s.
  • Nearly one-third of respondents said their hiring plan for 2017 would grow by 10% to 15%. But another 27.5% said their plan was still being worked on as of the end of Q4. Another 18.3% plan to hiring aggressively, citing 15% growth or more in their hiring plan for 2017.
  • User experience design and web development projects were cited most often as driving corporate hiring needs in 2017. Software application developers/architects were the roles that employers expect to recruit most aggressively for in 2017.

TIP TUESDAY: 7 Words to Delete from Your Cover Letters

Writing a cover letter to pitch your qualifications and your personality in only a few paragraphs is usually the most difficult part of applying for a job. As a general rule of thumb, a cover letter can make or break your likelihood to get called in for an interview.

“Cover letters give you a way to make a first impression and to directly address the key requirements of the position, helping to get you past the initial screening and encouraging the HR officer to read a little deeper,” explains business psychologist and executive career coach Kate Sullivan. “The best cover letters present you as a unique person with valuable skills, telling a story about your background and experience that lets the recruiter immediately envision you fitting into the company culture. It should always be customized to the position and its requirements and should hook your reader in like a great novel.

“The one firm rule for a cover letter is to keep it short: No more than two or three short paragraphs. And don’t revisit every single big job you’ve had, because they can see that on your resume. The cover letter exists purely to distill your achievement and put then in a new light.Take the advice of career experts and coaches who shed light on the type of words you should delete from your cover letter ASAP.