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TIP TUESDAY: 8 Differences You Need to Know About Generation Z vs. Millennials

The next generation hungry to enter the workplace is Generation Z. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, Generation Z (the post-Millennial generation) makes up 25% of the population. (See, Who Is Generation Z? 4 Big Ways They Will Be Different, to learn more.)

Sixty-two percent of Generation Zers anticipate challenges working with Baby Boomers and Generation Xers vs. only 5% who anticipate challenges working with Millennials.

Companies with a firm understanding of the expectations and preferences of the emerging generation will be well-equipped to attract the next generation of talent, maximize their potential, alleviate the inevitable cross-generational challenges, and capitalize on cognitive diversity through a generationally diverse workforce.

Here are eight key differences you need to know:

1. Realistic vs. Optomistic

Seventy-seven percent of Generation Zers expect to work harder than previous generations.

Millennials became optimistic thanks to their encouraging Baby Boomer parents and growing up in a time of prosperity and opportunity. Generation Zers will be realistic thanks to their skeptical and straight-shooting Generation X parents and growing up in a recession. According to Pew Charitable Trusts, during the Great Recession, the median net worth of Generation Z’s parents fell by nearly 45%.

2. Independent vs. Collaborative

Seventy-one percent of Generation Zers said they believe the phrase “if you want it done right, then do it yourself.”

When given the option to arrange a group of desks, Millennials would opt for a collaborative arrangement and assemble the desks into a circle. Generation Z will be more competitive with their colleagues and will harness a do-it-yourself mentality at work. In fact, 69% of Generation Zers would rather have their own work space than share it with someone else.

3. Digital Natives vs. Digital Pioneers

Forty percent of Generation Zers said that working Wi-Fi was more important to them than working bathrooms.

According to Pew Research, only 14% of U.S. adults had access to the Internet in 1995, but by 2014, 87% had access. Millennials were pioneers in the digital age. They witnessed the introduction and rise of social media, instant messaging, smartphones, search engines, and the mobile revolution. Generation Z did not witness these innovations, but rather, they were born into it. Ubiquitous connectivity, highly curated global information, on-demand video, and 24/7 news cycles are native to Generation Z.

4. Private vs. Public

Seventy percent of Generation Zers would rather share personal information with their pet than with their boss.

As digital pioneers, Millennials explored (and in some cases exploited) social media and made public their thoughts, opinions, and every noteworthy or menial life update. With safety and security top of mind, Generation Zers will be much more calculated and/or selective with the information they share online. For example, Generation Z gravitated to Snapchat because of the time-bound content that won’t live online forever like a Tweet or Facebook post would.

5. Face-to-Face vs. Digital Only

Seventy-four percent of Generation Z prefer to communicate face-to-face with colleagues.

Millennials pioneered many of the digital communication tools (e.g., texting, instant messaging, Slack) that have made the workplace more efficient and effective but, some would argue, less personable. Equipped with their experience communicating using full sight, sound, and motion over Skype®, FaceTime, Snapchat, etc., Generation Z is positioned as the ideal generation to finally strike the right balance between online and offline workplace communications.

6. On Demand Learning vs. Formally Educated

Seventy-five percent of Generation Z say there are other ways of getting a good education than by going to college, according to Sparks & Honey.

Millennials are questioning if their large student debt was worth it, especially considering that 44% of recent college grads are employed in jobs not requiring degrees, and one in eight recent college grads are unemployed. Generation Z will explore education alternatives. They will pursue on-demand or just-in-time learning solutions, like how-to YouTube tutorials, or will seek employers that offer robust on-the-job and development training.

6. Role-Hopping vs. Job-Hopping

Seventy-five percent of Generation Z would be interested in a situation in which they could have multiple roles within one place of employment.

Growing up in fast times and coming of age in an on-demand culture, Millennials have little patience for stagnation, especially when it comes to their careers. Generation Z won’t want to miss out on any valuable experience and will want to flex their on-demand learning muscle by trying out various roles or projects (e.g., marketing, accounting, human resources) inside of the organization.

8. Golden Citizen vs. Global Spectator

Fifty-eight percent of adults worldwide aged 35+ agree that “kids today have more in common with their global peers than they do with adults in their own country.”

Millennials were considered the first global generation because they shared similar characteristics and values across borders, and they were able to view significant global events in real time. However, Generation Z interacts with their global peers with greater fluidity than any other generation. As more of the world comes online, geographies will continue to shrink, causing Generation Z to view themselves as global citizens.

Ryan Jenkins is an internationally recognized Millennial and Generation Z keynote speaker, Inc.com columnist, and author of The Millennial Manual: The Complete How-To Guide to Manage, Develop, and Engage Millennials at Work.

WEDNESDAY WORKFACT: Changing Compensation Costs in the Chicago Metropolitan Area — June 2017

Total compensation costs for private industry workers increased 2.8 percent in the Chicago-Naperville-Michigan City, Ill.-Ind.-Wis. metropolitan area for the year ended in June 2017, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. Assistant Commissioner for Regional Operations Charlene Peiffer noted that a year earlier, Chicago experienced a gain of 1.9 percent in total compensation costs. Locally, wages and salaries, the largest component of total compensation costs, rose 2.8 percent over the 12-month period ended June 2017. Nationwide, total compensation costs and wages and salaries increased 2.4 percent each, over the same period.

Chicago is 1 of 15 metropolitan areas in the United States, and 1 of 3 areas in the Midwest region of the country, for which locality compensation cost data are now available. Among these 15 largest areas, over-the-year percentage increases in total compensation costs ranged from 3.7 percent in Miami-Fort Lauderdale-Pompano Beach, Fla. to 1.9 percent in Washington-Baltimore-Northern Virginia, D.C.-Md.-Va.-W.Va. in June 2017. For wages and salaries, Miami registered the largest annual gain (3.9 percent) among the 15 areas, while wages in Philadelphia-Camden-Vineland, Pa.-N.J.-Del.-Md. registered the smallest annual gain (2.0 percent).

Chicago’s annual increase in total compensation costs in June 2017, at 2.8 percent, compared to gains of 3.0 and 2.1 percent, respectively, in Minneapolis-St. Paul-St. Cloud, Minn.-Wis. and Detroit-Warren-Flint, Mich., the two other metropolitan areas in the Midwest. Chicago’s 2.8-percent increase in wages and salaries over this 12-month period compared to advances of 3.0 percent in Minneapolis and 2.2 percent in Detroit.

Locality compensation costs are part of the national Employment Cost Index (ECI), which measures quarterly changes in compensation costs, which include wages, salaries and employer costs for employee benefits. In addition to the 15 locality estimates provided in this release, ECI data for the nation, 4 geographical regions, and 9 geographical divisions are available.

In addition to the geographic data, a comprehensive national report is available that provides data by industry, occupational group, and union status, as well as for both private and state and local government employees. The release is available on the Internet at www.bls.gov/ncs/ect/home.htm. Current and historical information from other Bureau programs may be accessed via the BLS regional homepage at www.bls.gov/regions/midwest/.

{Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor}

TIP TUESDAY: Time Management Advice for Recruiters, From Recruiters

by Roy Maurer for SHRM online

A recruiter’s day is spent juggling applicants, candidates, hiring managers, e-mails, phone screens, intake meetings, queries and reports—making effective time management a critical skill to stay above water.

Time management doesn’t need to be complex or high maintenance. Many of the talent acquisition professionals interviewed for this article described themselves as “old school” when discussing what works best for them.

In a response typical of those interviewed, Wal-Mart Senior Corporate Recruiter Catherine Pylant said that she has “dabbled with a lot of different organizational platforms, apps and methods,” but ultimately she goes back to “tried-and-true handwritten notes and utilizing the Microsoft Office suite.”

Take Notes

Keeping a list of what you want to accomplish is a basic organizational tactic, whether you prefer writing it out by hand or using digital list-making tools.

“The act of writing down my workday’s goals with pencil and paper really helps me stay focused,” said Michelle Cugini, an HR and talent acquisition consultant at HRawesome, based in Oceanside, Calif.

“A notepad next to my keyboard is all I need,” said Nina Rodriguez, an Orlando, Fla.-based recruiter for online travel site Booking.com. “Once I finish the task, I cross it off the list. If it’s something pertinent that I need an alert for, I just plug it into my Google calendar. If I want to keep an electronic note for future reference, I use Notes for Google Drive, which is an extension on my browser and easy to access without having to open a new tab.”

Task management apps like Asana and Trello are also effective, De Pape said. “Pick a tool you’re already comfortable with and be sure it’s something you can keep at your side at all times,” he said. “Avoid software that lives exclusively on your desktop and doesn’t sync between devices.”

De Pape recommended capturing clear, specific information when jotting down tasks. “Assume you’ll forget the details, because you will,” he said.

Block Time

Assign yourself time to accomplish assignments. Mustain uses Calendly, a scheduler app, to block time in her day. “I go in on Fridays and block off meetings and sourcing power hours for the next week,” she said. She uses a planner to set daily goals like “source 20 candidates, do three interviews and submit five people,” she said.

Pylant cautioned recruiters to be realistic when blocking time. “If you underestimate a meeting or task, it will throw off the rest of your blocked time for the day—and sometimes week.” She also recommended adding a floating 30-minute time block each day, which can be parceled out to make up for unexpected but unavoidable time-wasters—like a meeting that goes too long or being stopped in the hallway by a chatty colleague.

Prioritize Tasks

When it comes to prioritizing tasks, solutions range from the simple—Pylant keeps a written list handy and constantly updates and reprioritizes it—to more complex organizational methods.

For each task, Mustain considers where in the process the related requisition lies, the urgency of the task and the stakeholders involved. “If your boss is coming to you with something urgent, that ranks higher than a candidate who needs something on the side that can wait.”

She spends the first hour and the last part of each day reading e-mails and schedules her sourcing time early in the morning. “I can get people responding that same day and that drives my results,” she said. “I’ll target what is the most value-add for my time.”

Mustain also believes in getting the most challenging tasks done early in the workday. “Try to do the things you are most reluctant to do in the morning,” she said. “If you hate calling to decline people, do it in the morning and get it over with or it will hang on you all day.”

It gets tougher to solve problems and complete challenging work later in the day, De Pape agreed. He schedules calls and meetings and does administrative tasks during the “downtime” periods of the day, such as right before breaking for lunch or midafternoon.

Take Breaks

Everyone knows that taking breaks during the workday is important for recharging, but many recruiters find this hard to do. “In my time in recruitment as well as working remotely, I have found myself many times logging in at 8 a.m. and then the next thing I know it is 6 p.m., and I never took a break and sometimes forgot to eat,” Pylant said.

“I schedule a lunch hour on my calendar every day,” Mustain said, even though she admitted that she usually works through it, eating at her desk. “When you are doing anything for over 90 minutes, you need to step away and take some time to clear your mind. Take a walk, grab a cup of coffee or chat with colleagues.”

Take breaks away from your desk or work area when possible. “I like to take a walk at lunch and maybe even a quick walk around the building for a shorter break during the day,” Cugini said. “Hopefully others are breaking at the same time, and we can walk and talk about life outside of work. Workplace friendships have such a big impact on employee engagement, and these walks and talks have proven that to me over and over again.”

Was this article useful? SHRM offers thousands of tools, templates and other exclusive member benefits, including compliance updates, sample policies, HR expert advice, education discounts, a growing online member community and much more. Visit SHRM online.

TIP TUESDAY: 7 Practices of Extraordinary Workplace Teams

HR Works: 7 Practices of Extraordinary Workplace Teams

WEDNESDAY WORKFACT: Onboarding Employees for Success

{by Christine Marino at http://blog.clickboarding.com/employee-engagement-onboarding-impacts-performance}

 

Employee engagement is a perpetual hot-button topic for employers as research have shown that as many as 70% of employees are disengaged at work. This means less productivity for employees and endless frustration for you and your management team. The best way to create a culture that is engaged and happy is by engaging your employees as soon as possible — during the onboarding process.

Use Culture to Propel Employee Engagement

There’s more to early onboarding than having legal paperwork completed by their first day. Almost 50% of potential employees explore company materials (like their careers website) to get a feel for the company’s values and cultural fit. For employers, this means “cultural onboarding” needs to start well before an employee starts working. Provide your new hires with digital information as part of their onboarding material. Be sure to explain what your company is about and contextualize their job within its larger vision. This gives your hire a better idea of the company they’re about to work for, easing them into the job.

Be Proactive and Smile

You’ve told your new hire where their office is and what events go on the company calendar… now what? What do candidates want from their onboarding? According to a recent survey by BambooHR, 23% of new hires who left their jobs within six months of starting wanted clearer guidelines about their responsibilities. 17% felt “a friendly smile or helpful co-worker would have made all the difference.” The message? When it comes to onboarding, a little friendliness goes a long way.

Better Performance Through Extended Onboarding

Research shows that employee onboarding programs increase performance by 11%. Now imagine what you could do if you truly engaged your employees before day one. The more you teach your employees before they get into the on-the-job training, the faster they’ll be able to do their job.

When performance is taken into consideration, every day counts. Even day-one.  Many companies have a probationary period, so understanding an employee’s growth from the first day is a crucial predictor to their performance in the future. The average time for a professional employee to reach full productivity is about 20 weeks. 26 weeks for those at the executive level. So no matter how minor it may be, every little thing you teach an employee through onboarding will cut down on this time, meaning higher performance and better work sooner.

It’s simple: if you want your employees to engage with your company culture, have a better onboarding experience, and grow into their own as employees more quickly, you need to engage with them before and throughout the onboarding process. Even something as simple as a positive attitude can go a long way. If you engage your new hires during onboarding, you’re setting your employees up for better performance and a better experience.