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TIP TUESDAY: 8 Differences You Need to Know About Generation Z vs. Millennials

The next generation hungry to enter the workplace is Generation Z. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, Generation Z (the post-Millennial generation) makes up 25% of the population. (See, Who Is Generation Z? 4 Big Ways They Will Be Different, to learn more.)

Sixty-two percent of Generation Zers anticipate challenges working with Baby Boomers and Generation Xers vs. only 5% who anticipate challenges working with Millennials.

Companies with a firm understanding of the expectations and preferences of the emerging generation will be well-equipped to attract the next generation of talent, maximize their potential, alleviate the inevitable cross-generational challenges, and capitalize on cognitive diversity through a generationally diverse workforce.

Here are eight key differences you need to know:

1. Realistic vs. Optomistic

Seventy-seven percent of Generation Zers expect to work harder than previous generations.

Millennials became optimistic thanks to their encouraging Baby Boomer parents and growing up in a time of prosperity and opportunity. Generation Zers will be realistic thanks to their skeptical and straight-shooting Generation X parents and growing up in a recession. According to Pew Charitable Trusts, during the Great Recession, the median net worth of Generation Z’s parents fell by nearly 45%.

2. Independent vs. Collaborative

Seventy-one percent of Generation Zers said they believe the phrase “if you want it done right, then do it yourself.”

When given the option to arrange a group of desks, Millennials would opt for a collaborative arrangement and assemble the desks into a circle. Generation Z will be more competitive with their colleagues and will harness a do-it-yourself mentality at work. In fact, 69% of Generation Zers would rather have their own work space than share it with someone else.

3. Digital Natives vs. Digital Pioneers

Forty percent of Generation Zers said that working Wi-Fi was more important to them than working bathrooms.

According to Pew Research, only 14% of U.S. adults had access to the Internet in 1995, but by 2014, 87% had access. Millennials were pioneers in the digital age. They witnessed the introduction and rise of social media, instant messaging, smartphones, search engines, and the mobile revolution. Generation Z did not witness these innovations, but rather, they were born into it. Ubiquitous connectivity, highly curated global information, on-demand video, and 24/7 news cycles are native to Generation Z.

4. Private vs. Public

Seventy percent of Generation Zers would rather share personal information with their pet than with their boss.

As digital pioneers, Millennials explored (and in some cases exploited) social media and made public their thoughts, opinions, and every noteworthy or menial life update. With safety and security top of mind, Generation Zers will be much more calculated and/or selective with the information they share online. For example, Generation Z gravitated to Snapchat because of the time-bound content that won’t live online forever like a Tweet or Facebook post would.

5. Face-to-Face vs. Digital Only

Seventy-four percent of Generation Z prefer to communicate face-to-face with colleagues.

Millennials pioneered many of the digital communication tools (e.g., texting, instant messaging, Slack) that have made the workplace more efficient and effective but, some would argue, less personable. Equipped with their experience communicating using full sight, sound, and motion over Skype®, FaceTime, Snapchat, etc., Generation Z is positioned as the ideal generation to finally strike the right balance between online and offline workplace communications.

6. On Demand Learning vs. Formally Educated

Seventy-five percent of Generation Z say there are other ways of getting a good education than by going to college, according to Sparks & Honey.

Millennials are questioning if their large student debt was worth it, especially considering that 44% of recent college grads are employed in jobs not requiring degrees, and one in eight recent college grads are unemployed. Generation Z will explore education alternatives. They will pursue on-demand or just-in-time learning solutions, like how-to YouTube tutorials, or will seek employers that offer robust on-the-job and development training.

6. Role-Hopping vs. Job-Hopping

Seventy-five percent of Generation Z would be interested in a situation in which they could have multiple roles within one place of employment.

Growing up in fast times and coming of age in an on-demand culture, Millennials have little patience for stagnation, especially when it comes to their careers. Generation Z won’t want to miss out on any valuable experience and will want to flex their on-demand learning muscle by trying out various roles or projects (e.g., marketing, accounting, human resources) inside of the organization.

8. Golden Citizen vs. Global Spectator

Fifty-eight percent of adults worldwide aged 35+ agree that “kids today have more in common with their global peers than they do with adults in their own country.”

Millennials were considered the first global generation because they shared similar characteristics and values across borders, and they were able to view significant global events in real time. However, Generation Z interacts with their global peers with greater fluidity than any other generation. As more of the world comes online, geographies will continue to shrink, causing Generation Z to view themselves as global citizens.

Ryan Jenkins is an internationally recognized Millennial and Generation Z keynote speaker, Inc.com columnist, and author of The Millennial Manual: The Complete How-To Guide to Manage, Develop, and Engage Millennials at Work.

TIP TUESDAY: 5 Lies to Watch For When Hiring

A survey from Right Management reports that the cost of a bad hire can range from one to five times the salary of the individual. According to background screening leader HireRight, job seekers very often exaggerate, falsify credentials and outright lie on their job applications, especially in today’s competitive job market.

Thus, the chances of hiring the wrong person escalate. The prevalence of candidates lying on job applications and resumes, if not outright fraud, at the very least provides reason for small businesses to conduct comprehensive background checks.

Here are five of the most popular lies told by job candidates that employers should watch out for:

1. Exaggerating dates of past employment

As many as 34 percent of all resumes include discrepancies related to previous employment. Candidates often stretch the truth to cover gaps in their work history they may not want to explain — like the job seeker who extended his employment dates to cover a six month jail sentence! Sometimes discrepancies are honest mistakes, but employers should always verify employment dates.

2. Falsifying the degree or credential earned

There is roughly a 20 percent discrepancy rate in education qualifications provided by candidates. Often a resume will tout a degree when a candidate only took some classes, or exaggerate a major so the candidate appears more qualified for the job. Other candidates forge diplomas, claim degrees earned by family members or purchase degrees from diploma mills. The latter can be very difficult to identify, but knowledgeable background checking firms compile detailed databases of known diploma mills so frauds can be identified.

3. Inflating salary or title

It’s hardly surprising that a candidate might exaggerate these important facts to get a better job or a higher salary. That’s why companies typically contact previous employers to verify positions held by the candidate. Salary verification can be more difficult since many companies will not reveal this information. In such cases, asking the candidate for previous W-2 forms as proof is a wise step.

4. Concealing a criminal record

The most serious reason companies must perform background checks is to maintain a safe workplace. Roughly 11 percent of all background checks return a criminal record. Disturbingly, criminals are most attracted to companies where they know they will not be checked, therefore smaller businesses may be a target. Criminal applicants often try to avoid detection through nondisclosure or by changing details such as the spelling of their names or dates of birth.

5. Hiding a drug habit

Since 42 percent of Americans admit to using an illegal drug in their lifetime, screening candidates for drug use is a wise idea for small businesses. Drug users go to great lengths to beat these tests — such as adulterating urine samples — but today’s drug tests are increasingly sophisticated and can identify true positives and negatives despite the attempts of those trying to cover up drug use.

{by John Reese, HireRight, as featured in business know-how online}

TIP TUESDAY: Contract, In-Office, Remote – Which is the Best Hiring Solution for Your Company?

Bringing on talent as your business grows is a big step, and depending on your needs, there are several options to consider. According to CareerBuilder’s 2017 midyear hiring forecast, 40 percent of employers said they planned to hire regular full-time employees this year, while half of all employers anticipate adding temporary or contract workers. So how do you determine the best hiring solution for your company?

Contract workers are ideal for boosting talent for short-term projects that require a very specific set of skills. The pros are simplicity and flexibility. Hiring contract workers is a less complicated and less expensive process than hiring an employee. With freelancers, it’s just a matter of drawing up a contract, and they can begin immediately—no need for lengthy onboarding, and because they are not on staff, you don’t have to provide a benefits package. Other than filling out a 1099-MISC form at the end of the year that specifies how much you paid that person, you also don’t have to worry about withholding or paying FICA taxes. Because contractors don’t require the same investment of time and money as hired employees, there is a lot less pressure should you decide to cut ties or work with someone else.

The cons are less control and potential IRS issues. Unlike your own employees, contract workers are self-employed, therefore you don’t have the authority to dictate work hours. You also cannot expect to have 9-5 access to them since they likely have other clients. Other than project specifications and a deadline, you don’t have much authority.

If you hire freelancers and become the subject of an audit from the IRS or the Department of Labor, you’ll have to be prepared to prove they were not, in fact, your employees. Do yourself a favor and review the IRS guidelines on how to determine whether the individuals providing services are employees or independent contractors.

In-office hires work well for companies that need someone to provide long-term value and wear several hats. The pros include engagement, longevity and onsite management. Employees who are part of your team become invested in the success of the company. Unlike contractors who have their own business, your employee’s success is directly related to the success of the business overall. Plus, by providing a competitive salary and growth opportunities, you can retain your best talent.

People who work for your company are essentially subject to your workplace rules. You set the work hours, the training programs, the productivity expectations, and can require that the person only work for you.

The con is risk. Recruiting and onboarding a new employee is a big time and money investment, and if it doesn’t work out, you have to start from scratch. Plus, a hire gone badly can negatively affect the morale of other staffers.

Remote employees add talent without using up office real estate. The pros are saving money, boosting productivity and hiring from a larger talent pool. According to a recent survey, nearly six out of 10 employers say allowing some staffers to telecommute provides cost savings. Telecommuters at Compaq, Best Buy, British Telecom and Dow Chemical have all shown to be as much as 45 percent more productive. Without the distractions that sometimes happen in an office, focused remote workers can get more done. When you’re not limited by geography, you can stretch your talent search to find employees who more closely match the roles you need to fill.

The cons include employees being tougher to supervise and feeling disconnected. Culture is such an important part of business success, and that can be difficult to cultivate for the portion of your workforce who works remotely. To help staffers feel a sense of camaraderie, you’ll have to be more proactive about planning in-person functions and meetings. Despite the productivity potential, if your remote workers aren’t self-motivated, it can be hard to manage them from afar. Plus, certain types of jobs might benefit from face-to-face brainstorming and collaboration.

Deciding which type of hiring solution is right for you comes down to your needs—if it’s a short- or long-term project, your physical office space and your budget. The good news is that you can decide on a case-by-case basis, and build a hybrid workforce that is optimized for efficiency.

Call us at The Hire Solution, 630-953-7370 to talk about your needs and how to choose the right talent for the job.

WORKFACT WEDNESDAY: Resumes, Recruiting & HR

Whether looking for a new job, need help with your resume or are ready to build your team, you can appreciate some of these fun facts as they relate to recruiting and human resources.

  • 79% of candidates are likely to use social media in their job search
  • 65% of recruiters use Facebook in recruiting
  • 18% search for jobs from a restroom
  • 30% search for new jobs while at work
  • 38% search during their commute
  • 41% of job seekers search for jobs while in bed
  • 93% of companies use LinkedIn for recruiting
  • 89% of recruiters have hired someone through LinkedIn
  • 70% of candidates use a mobile device to find jobs
  • Average time spent by recruiters looking at a resume: 5 to 7 seconds
  • 76% of resumes are discarded for an unprofessional email address
  • More than 90% of resumes are now posted online or sent via email

WEDNESDAY WORKFACT: Changing Compensation Costs in the Chicago Metropolitan Area — June 2017

Total compensation costs for private industry workers increased 2.8 percent in the Chicago-Naperville-Michigan City, Ill.-Ind.-Wis. metropolitan area for the year ended in June 2017, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. Assistant Commissioner for Regional Operations Charlene Peiffer noted that a year earlier, Chicago experienced a gain of 1.9 percent in total compensation costs. Locally, wages and salaries, the largest component of total compensation costs, rose 2.8 percent over the 12-month period ended June 2017. Nationwide, total compensation costs and wages and salaries increased 2.4 percent each, over the same period.

Chicago is 1 of 15 metropolitan areas in the United States, and 1 of 3 areas in the Midwest region of the country, for which locality compensation cost data are now available. Among these 15 largest areas, over-the-year percentage increases in total compensation costs ranged from 3.7 percent in Miami-Fort Lauderdale-Pompano Beach, Fla. to 1.9 percent in Washington-Baltimore-Northern Virginia, D.C.-Md.-Va.-W.Va. in June 2017. For wages and salaries, Miami registered the largest annual gain (3.9 percent) among the 15 areas, while wages in Philadelphia-Camden-Vineland, Pa.-N.J.-Del.-Md. registered the smallest annual gain (2.0 percent).

Chicago’s annual increase in total compensation costs in June 2017, at 2.8 percent, compared to gains of 3.0 and 2.1 percent, respectively, in Minneapolis-St. Paul-St. Cloud, Minn.-Wis. and Detroit-Warren-Flint, Mich., the two other metropolitan areas in the Midwest. Chicago’s 2.8-percent increase in wages and salaries over this 12-month period compared to advances of 3.0 percent in Minneapolis and 2.2 percent in Detroit.

Locality compensation costs are part of the national Employment Cost Index (ECI), which measures quarterly changes in compensation costs, which include wages, salaries and employer costs for employee benefits. In addition to the 15 locality estimates provided in this release, ECI data for the nation, 4 geographical regions, and 9 geographical divisions are available.

In addition to the geographic data, a comprehensive national report is available that provides data by industry, occupational group, and union status, as well as for both private and state and local government employees. The release is available on the Internet at www.bls.gov/ncs/ect/home.htm. Current and historical information from other Bureau programs may be accessed via the BLS regional homepage at www.bls.gov/regions/midwest/.

{Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor}