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WORKFACT WEDNESDAY: Resumes, Recruiting & HR

Whether looking for a new job, need help with your resume or are ready to build your team, you can appreciate some of these fun facts as they relate to recruiting and human resources.

  • 79% of candidates are likely to use social media in their job search
  • 65% of recruiters use Facebook in recruiting
  • 18% search for jobs from a restroom
  • 30% search for new jobs while at work
  • 38% search during their commute
  • 41% of job seekers search for jobs while in bed
  • 93% of companies use LinkedIn for recruiting
  • 89% of recruiters have hired someone through LinkedIn
  • 70% of candidates use a mobile device to find jobs
  • Average time spent by recruiters looking at a resume: 5 to 7 seconds
  • 76% of resumes are discarded for an unprofessional email address
  • More than 90% of resumes are now posted online or sent via email

TIP TUESDAY: The Secret to a Great Resume

Let’s be honest: the job hunt can feel excruciatingly painful—and intimidating. Sure, your Linkedin profile could be airtight, your references flawless. But if your resume bombs, so does your chance at acing your interview. On top of that, hiring managers only spend about six seconds on a resume—research says so!—which makes creating the perfect one even more crucial. What is the typical job seeker to do?

Forget everything you thought you knew about resumes, including summaries and volunteer experience. According to experts, the secret to a great resume lies in the results.

Here’s what they mean: Listing your accomplishments on your resume with adjectives like “detail-oriented” or “self-motivated” might seem impressive to you. But odds are the employer won’t believe it until you prove your worth with numbers.

“If you want to make that indelible first impression on a hiring manager, you must show movement and real progress, and quantify your accomplishments with real, hard data,” Brian de Haaff, CEO of Aha!, wrote for Huffington Post. “Your results-focused resume will present a more accurate snapshot of who you are and what you can do—and clear the way for others to see that too.”

Take, for example, a descriptor like “Successfully trained the customer success team to improve customer communications.” Although the task itself sounds impressive, de Haaff suggests trying this instead: “Created 25 template responses and trained the customer success team, reducing average response time to under two hours.”

See the difference? According to de Haaff, the second descriptor provides a clearer picture of the direct impact you made on the company. Plus, quantifiable achievements do more than spice up your resume. Regardless of whether you’re a new grad or an experienced job hunter, they also tell a story about your past success, work ethic, and credibility, de Haaff says. And for employers, that detail can make or break your chances of landing the all-important interview (not to mention the job).

{from Reader’s Digest}

WEDNESDAY WORKFACT: Unemployment in the U.S. and Illinois

The table in the article ranks the 50 states of the United States by unemployment rate. In July 2017, about 2.2% of the North Dakota population was unemployed, the lowest among the states; the highest unemployment rate was recorded in Alaska, at 7.0%. Illinois has the 14th highest unemployment rate, at 4.4%, or 183.3 million. In May of 2016, Illinois had the highest unemployment rate in the nation, at 6.6%.

A person is considered unemployed if they have no job and are currently looking for a job and available to work. The U.S. unemployment rate varies unemployment-rateacross states. Nation-wide unemployment was 4.4 percent as of April 2017 and has remained almost the same over the last year. Unemployment can be affected by various factors including economic conditions and global competition. During economic prosperity unemployment rates generally decrease and during times of recession, rates increase.

Many Americans believe that job creation should be one of the most important priorities set by the government. Since 1990, the country’s unemployment rate reached a low of 4 percent in 2000 and a high in 2010 at 9.6 percent. It has been argued that the definition of unemployment is too narrow and does not include some groups of people, such as the “underemployed” and the “hidden unemployed”, which account for about 3.3 million Americans.

TIP TUESDAY: 7 Words to Delete from Your Cover Letters

Writing a cover letter to pitch your qualifications and your personality in only a few paragraphs is usually the most difficult part of applying for a job. As a general rule of thumb, a cover letter can make or break your likelihood to get called in for an interview.

“Cover letters give you a way to make a first impression and to directly address the key requirements of the position, helping to get you past the initial screening and encouraging the HR officer to read a little deeper,” explains business psychologist and executive career coach Kate Sullivan. “The best cover letters present you as a unique person with valuable skills, telling a story about your background and experience that lets the recruiter immediately envision you fitting into the company culture. It should always be customized to the position and its requirements and should hook your reader in like a great novel.

“The one firm rule for a cover letter is to keep it short: No more than two or three short paragraphs. And don’t revisit every single big job you’ve had, because they can see that on your resume. The cover letter exists purely to distill your achievement and put then in a new light.Take the advice of career experts and coaches who shed light on the type of words you should delete from your cover letter ASAP.

TIP TUESDAY: Axe These 7 Words from Your Cover Letter

Tedious, yet mandatory: writing a cover letter to pitch your qualifications and your personality in only a few paragraphs is usually the most difficult part of applying for a job.

The worst part: as a general rule of thumb, a cover letter can make or break your likelihood to get called in for an interview.

“Cover letters give you a way to make a first impression and to directly address the key requirements of the position, helping to get you past the initial screening and encouraging the HR officer to read a little deeper,” explains business psychologist and executive career coach Kate Sullivan. “The best cover letters present you as a unique person with valuable skills, telling a story about your background and experience that lets the recruiter immediately envision you fitting into the company culture. It should always be customized to the position and its requirements and should hook your reader in like a great novel.”

The one firm rule for a cover letter is to keep it short: No more than two or three short paragraphs. And don’t revisit every single big job you’ve had, because they can see that on your resume. The cover letter exists purely to distill your achievements and put them in a new light.

Take the following advice of career experts and coaches who shed light on the type of words you should probably CTRL+F and ‘Delete’ out of your cover letter ASAP.

Never say ‘never’ – literally

While a wildly different endeavor, consider the last time you went on a bad first date. Was the person negative? Or difficult to get to know? Since your cover letter is the first introduction into who you are and what you offer, using an absolute word like ‘never’ isn’t recommended by career coach Cheryl Palmer.

She explains that some entry-level applicants or those who have recently switched direction may be tempted to over-explain their lack of experience. Instead, she says to make lemonade out of those lemons.

“Remember, if you are a new graduate or someone transitioning into a new field, it is understandable that you don’t have experience in that area yet,” she notes. “Instead talk about internships you may have had or experience that may not be directly in the field but is still relevant.”

Always avoid ‘always’

Another absolute word, that while positive, can be misleading in your cover letter. Why? The person reading it doesn’t know you, so his or her first assumption could be that you are exaggerating.

Instead, replace the ‘always’ statement with a few examples that demonstrate why you would be the ideal hire. These should include accomplishments you’ve had in other jobs, noting measurable proof that you can speak more to them when you’re called in for a face-to-face chat. This will prove your credibility and how ‘always’ on top of your game you really are.

To ‘whom’ it may concern is no one

Sullivan notes that ‘to whom it may concern’ is an outdated way to approach job applications, especially when you have the Internet. Because you can search for the names of whomever might be your future manager or the director of HR at the company you’re trying to land a gig at, addressing them anonymously appears lazy and shows you have little interest in the company.

If you can’t find the right person to address your letter to, simply ignore the opening salutation and launch straight into your letter.

Even though it’s easy to say ‘even though’ – don’t

Much like the compliment sandwiches that your mama taught you to practice when arguing with your roommate in college, setting up a sentence with ‘even though’ in your cover letter can send a Debbie Downer message to your potential employer. “I have seen cover letters where job seekers say something like, ‘Even though I have not worked with XYZ software before….’ This type of statement automatically points the reader’s attention to a deficit,” Palmer explains. Place the emphasis on what you have done, instead of what you haven’t.” For example, talk about software that you have used that serves the same purpose and/or is very similar to the software that the company is asking that job seekers have experience in.”

Really, really don’t say ‘really’

Ever have someone really, really like you, but you don’t quite really, really like them? It can be a turn-off, and the same goes for applying for a gig. Using ‘really’ may make you come across as over-eager or like you’re trying too hard. It also usually doesn’t add anything to a sentence: saying “I’m really good at Photoshop” is less effective than, “I have more than five years of experience using Photoshop daily.” Be specific instead of using generic adjectives to be sure you sound as suited for the position as you are.

Forget how you ‘feel’

True statement: you probably do feel like you’ve stumbled upon the most amazing, perfect job that you could ever, ever apply for. Also a true statement: your employer doesn’t need to know that, quite yet. In fact, having “feel” in your cover letter can make you seem less mature, secure or qualified for the opportunity; craft your cover letter in a way that makes the person reading it feel like you’re the surefire hire.

“State your qualifications as fact, and do the same with your assertion that you’ll make a good addition to the company,” Sullivan says. “Project confidence through your assertions, rather than hedging your bets by saying you feel that way, which makes it into an opinion – and opinions can easily be disregarded.”

The words “believe” and “think” can also make you sound uncertain about your abilities.

Honestly, ‘honestly’ is a big mistake

When you’re hired for a new gig, your first task is usually attending some sort of training where you learn about the ethics the company abides by. Even if you’re not saving lives or fighting fire, being honorable and trustworthy is considered a given in every workplace. So when you say ‘honestly’ – it might make you come across as insincere.

“The last thing you want is to have a recruiter questioning whether you’re telling the truth about anything on your resume or in your background,” says Sullivan. “Even in an innocuous sentence like ‘Honestly, I love accounting and can’t wait to put my skills to use for your company,’ it’s not appropriate and could backfire by sounding like you’re trying too hard to assure the recruiter of your feelings. Delete it!”