630.953.7370
info@thehiresolution.net

BLOG

TIP TUESDAY: Contract, In-Office, Remote – Which is the Best Hiring Solution for Your Company?

Bringing on talent as your business grows is a big step, and depending on your needs, there are several options to consider. According to CareerBuilder’s 2017 midyear hiring forecast, 40 percent of employers said they planned to hire regular full-time employees this year, while half of all employers anticipate adding temporary or contract workers. So how do you determine the best hiring solution for your company?

Contract workers are ideal for boosting talent for short-term projects that require a very specific set of skills. The pros are simplicity and flexibility. Hiring contract workers is a less complicated and less expensive process than hiring an employee. With freelancers, it’s just a matter of drawing up a contract, and they can begin immediately—no need for lengthy onboarding, and because they are not on staff, you don’t have to provide a benefits package. Other than filling out a 1099-MISC form at the end of the year that specifies how much you paid that person, you also don’t have to worry about withholding or paying FICA taxes. Because contractors don’t require the same investment of time and money as hired employees, there is a lot less pressure should you decide to cut ties or work with someone else.

The cons are less control and potential IRS issues. Unlike your own employees, contract workers are self-employed, therefore you don’t have the authority to dictate work hours. You also cannot expect to have 9-5 access to them since they likely have other clients. Other than project specifications and a deadline, you don’t have much authority.

If you hire freelancers and become the subject of an audit from the IRS or the Department of Labor, you’ll have to be prepared to prove they were not, in fact, your employees. Do yourself a favor and review the IRS guidelines on how to determine whether the individuals providing services are employees or independent contractors.

In-office hires work well for companies that need someone to provide long-term value and wear several hats. The pros include engagement, longevity and onsite management. Employees who are part of your team become invested in the success of the company. Unlike contractors who have their own business, your employee’s success is directly related to the success of the business overall. Plus, by providing a competitive salary and growth opportunities, you can retain your best talent.

People who work for your company are essentially subject to your workplace rules. You set the work hours, the training programs, the productivity expectations, and can require that the person only work for you.

The con is risk. Recruiting and onboarding a new employee is a big time and money investment, and if it doesn’t work out, you have to start from scratch. Plus, a hire gone badly can negatively affect the morale of other staffers.

Remote employees add talent without using up office real estate. The pros are saving money, boosting productivity and hiring from a larger talent pool. According to a recent survey, nearly six out of 10 employers say allowing some staffers to telecommute provides cost savings. Telecommuters at Compaq, Best Buy, British Telecom and Dow Chemical have all shown to be as much as 45 percent more productive. Without the distractions that sometimes happen in an office, focused remote workers can get more done. When you’re not limited by geography, you can stretch your talent search to find employees who more closely match the roles you need to fill.

The cons include employees being tougher to supervise and feeling disconnected. Culture is such an important part of business success, and that can be difficult to cultivate for the portion of your workforce who works remotely. To help staffers feel a sense of camaraderie, you’ll have to be more proactive about planning in-person functions and meetings. Despite the productivity potential, if your remote workers aren’t self-motivated, it can be hard to manage them from afar. Plus, certain types of jobs might benefit from face-to-face brainstorming and collaboration.

Deciding which type of hiring solution is right for you comes down to your needs—if it’s a short- or long-term project, your physical office space and your budget. The good news is that you can decide on a case-by-case basis, and build a hybrid workforce that is optimized for efficiency.

Call us at The Hire Solution, 630-953-7370 to talk about your needs and how to choose the right talent for the job.

WORKFACT WEDNESDAY: Resumes, Recruiting & HR

Whether looking for a new job, need help with your resume or are ready to build your team, you can appreciate some of these fun facts as they relate to recruiting and human resources.

  • 79% of candidates are likely to use social media in their job search
  • 65% of recruiters use Facebook in recruiting
  • 18% search for jobs from a restroom
  • 30% search for new jobs while at work
  • 38% search during their commute
  • 41% of job seekers search for jobs while in bed
  • 93% of companies use LinkedIn for recruiting
  • 89% of recruiters have hired someone through LinkedIn
  • 70% of candidates use a mobile device to find jobs
  • Average time spent by recruiters looking at a resume: 5 to 7 seconds
  • 76% of resumes are discarded for an unprofessional email address
  • More than 90% of resumes are now posted online or sent via email

TIP TUESDAY: The Secret to a Great Resume

Let’s be honest: the job hunt can feel excruciatingly painful—and intimidating. Sure, your Linkedin profile could be airtight, your references flawless. But if your resume bombs, so does your chance at acing your interview. On top of that, hiring managers only spend about six seconds on a resume—research says so!—which makes creating the perfect one even more crucial. What is the typical job seeker to do?

Forget everything you thought you knew about resumes, including summaries and volunteer experience. According to experts, the secret to a great resume lies in the results.

Here’s what they mean: Listing your accomplishments on your resume with adjectives like “detail-oriented” or “self-motivated” might seem impressive to you. But odds are the employer won’t believe it until you prove your worth with numbers.

“If you want to make that indelible first impression on a hiring manager, you must show movement and real progress, and quantify your accomplishments with real, hard data,” Brian de Haaff, CEO of Aha!, wrote for Huffington Post. “Your results-focused resume will present a more accurate snapshot of who you are and what you can do—and clear the way for others to see that too.”

Take, for example, a descriptor like “Successfully trained the customer success team to improve customer communications.” Although the task itself sounds impressive, de Haaff suggests trying this instead: “Created 25 template responses and trained the customer success team, reducing average response time to under two hours.”

See the difference? According to de Haaff, the second descriptor provides a clearer picture of the direct impact you made on the company. Plus, quantifiable achievements do more than spice up your resume. Regardless of whether you’re a new grad or an experienced job hunter, they also tell a story about your past success, work ethic, and credibility, de Haaff says. And for employers, that detail can make or break your chances of landing the all-important interview (not to mention the job).

{from Reader’s Digest}

THROWBACK THURSDAY: All You Need is One Good Idea: Campbell’s Soup Company

While Andy Warhol can be credited for establishing the classic Campbell’s soup can as an iconographic pop art emblem, he never campbells warholwould would have appropriated its imagery had it not already been iconic in its own right. That familiar red and white-labeled can has been on grocery store shelves since the turn of the 20th century, making it one of America’s most widely-recognized food products, ranking right up there with Oreos and Coca-Cola. Not much has changed in the last 120 years, which is to say, if it ain’t broke…don’t fix it.

The Campbell Soup Company’s founder Dr. John Thompson Dorrance completed his Ph.D in Chemistry in 1897 at MIT and Germany’s University of Goettingen, and later that year went to work for the Joseph Campbell Preserve Company in Philadelphia where his uncle Arthur Dorrance was a partner. The company had been established in 1869 by Joseph A. Campbell, a fruit merchant from Bridgeton, New Jersey, and Abraham Anderson, an icebox manufacturer from South Jersey. They produced canned tomatoes, vegetables, jellies, soups, condiments, and minced meats. campbell's soup boy

John Dorrance invented condensed soup there in 1899 when there were only two other soup companies in the U.S., who shipped soup in heavy, bulky cans which created problems in distribution, display and consumer use. Dorrance’s process developed a commercially viable method for condensing soup by halving the quantity of its heaviest ingredient: water; it was an immediate and rousing success. This innovation helped Campbell quickly outstrip its two soup-canning competitors – it was able to ship and sell its product at one-third the cost. campbellas first cansThere were five original varieties: Tomato, Consommé, Vegetable, Chicken, and Oxtail. By 1904, sales had reached 16 million cans annually; by 1911 the company was selling soup throughout the nation, becoming one of the first to achieve nationwide distribution of a brand name food.

Campbell’s products are now sold in 120 countries around the world with annual sales of $8,000,000,000.

Founder John Dorrance was just 56 years old when he died on Sept. 21, 1930, leaving the third largest estate recorded up to then: $115 million!

{Source: Campbell’s Soup Company online}

WEDNESDAY WORKFACT: Changing Compensation Costs in the Chicago Metropolitan Area — June 2017

Total compensation costs for private industry workers increased 2.8 percent in the Chicago-Naperville-Michigan City, Ill.-Ind.-Wis. metropolitan area for the year ended in June 2017, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. Assistant Commissioner for Regional Operations Charlene Peiffer noted that a year earlier, Chicago experienced a gain of 1.9 percent in total compensation costs. Locally, wages and salaries, the largest component of total compensation costs, rose 2.8 percent over the 12-month period ended June 2017. Nationwide, total compensation costs and wages and salaries increased 2.4 percent each, over the same period.

Chicago is 1 of 15 metropolitan areas in the United States, and 1 of 3 areas in the Midwest region of the country, for which locality compensation cost data are now available. Among these 15 largest areas, over-the-year percentage increases in total compensation costs ranged from 3.7 percent in Miami-Fort Lauderdale-Pompano Beach, Fla. to 1.9 percent in Washington-Baltimore-Northern Virginia, D.C.-Md.-Va.-W.Va. in June 2017. For wages and salaries, Miami registered the largest annual gain (3.9 percent) among the 15 areas, while wages in Philadelphia-Camden-Vineland, Pa.-N.J.-Del.-Md. registered the smallest annual gain (2.0 percent).

Chicago’s annual increase in total compensation costs in June 2017, at 2.8 percent, compared to gains of 3.0 and 2.1 percent, respectively, in Minneapolis-St. Paul-St. Cloud, Minn.-Wis. and Detroit-Warren-Flint, Mich., the two other metropolitan areas in the Midwest. Chicago’s 2.8-percent increase in wages and salaries over this 12-month period compared to advances of 3.0 percent in Minneapolis and 2.2 percent in Detroit.

Locality compensation costs are part of the national Employment Cost Index (ECI), which measures quarterly changes in compensation costs, which include wages, salaries and employer costs for employee benefits. In addition to the 15 locality estimates provided in this release, ECI data for the nation, 4 geographical regions, and 9 geographical divisions are available.

In addition to the geographic data, a comprehensive national report is available that provides data by industry, occupational group, and union status, as well as for both private and state and local government employees. The release is available on the Internet at www.bls.gov/ncs/ect/home.htm. Current and historical information from other Bureau programs may be accessed via the BLS regional homepage at www.bls.gov/regions/midwest/.

{Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor}