630.953.7370
info@thehiresolution.net

BLOG

THROWBACK THURSDAY: Mary Kay Ash Celebrates First Year in Business

On September 13, 1964, Mary Kay Ash celebrated the one-year anniversary of her company, Beauty by Mary Kay (now Mary Kay Cosmetics). Recognized today as one of America’s greatest entrepreneurs, Ash stepped into a man’s world in the 1960s to blaze a new path for women. After retiring from a successful career in direct sales, her dream was to provide women with an open-ended, unparalleled business opportunity. She founded “Beauty by Mary Kay” on Sept. 13, 1963 with her life savings of $5,000, the support of her family and nine Mary Kay Independent Beauty Consultants.

quote-my-company-mascot-is-the-bumblebee-because-of-its-tiny-wings-and-heavy-body-aerodynamically-mary-kay-ash-76-51-71Sales for the first year totaled $198,000 – about $1,584,000 in today’s economy. Today, Mary Kay Cosmetics is worth $3.8 billion and boasts a global sales force of more than 3,000,000 women.

For the one-year anniversary celebration, the company’s 200 employees gathered in a warehouse-like, newly built facility in Dallas. Mary Kay prepared and served chicken and Jell-O salad, and awarded the top salespeople with wigs.

In 1976 the company became the first with a female chairperson to be listed on the NYSE; by then her top salespeople were being awarded the company’s trademark pink Cadillacs. By “praising people to success” and “sandwiching every bit of criticism between two heavy layers of praise,” the energetic Texan opened new opportunities for women around the world and built a multibillion-dollar corporation.

WEDNESDAY WORKFACT: Unemployment in the U.S. and Illinois

The table in the article ranks the 50 states of the United States by unemployment rate. In July 2017, about 2.2% of the North Dakota population was unemployed, the lowest among the states; the highest unemployment rate was recorded in Alaska, at 7.0%. Illinois has the 14th highest unemployment rate, at 4.4%, or 183.3 million. In May of 2016, Illinois had the highest unemployment rate in the nation, at 6.6%.

A person is considered unemployed if they have no job and are currently looking for a job and available to work. The U.S. unemployment rate varies unemployment-rateacross states. Nation-wide unemployment was 4.4 percent as of April 2017 and has remained almost the same over the last year. Unemployment can be affected by various factors including economic conditions and global competition. During economic prosperity unemployment rates generally decrease and during times of recession, rates increase.

Many Americans believe that job creation should be one of the most important priorities set by the government. Since 1990, the country’s unemployment rate reached a low of 4 percent in 2000 and a high in 2010 at 9.6 percent. It has been argued that the definition of unemployment is too narrow and does not include some groups of people, such as the “underemployed” and the “hidden unemployed”, which account for about 3.3 million Americans.

TIP TUESDAY: Time Management Advice for Recruiters, From Recruiters

by Roy Maurer for SHRM online

A recruiter’s day is spent juggling applicants, candidates, hiring managers, e-mails, phone screens, intake meetings, queries and reports—making effective time management a critical skill to stay above water.

Time management doesn’t need to be complex or high maintenance. Many of the talent acquisition professionals interviewed for this article described themselves as “old school” when discussing what works best for them.

In a response typical of those interviewed, Wal-Mart Senior Corporate Recruiter Catherine Pylant said that she has “dabbled with a lot of different organizational platforms, apps and methods,” but ultimately she goes back to “tried-and-true handwritten notes and utilizing the Microsoft Office suite.”

Take Notes

Keeping a list of what you want to accomplish is a basic organizational tactic, whether you prefer writing it out by hand or using digital list-making tools.

“The act of writing down my workday’s goals with pencil and paper really helps me stay focused,” said Michelle Cugini, an HR and talent acquisition consultant at HRawesome, based in Oceanside, Calif.

“A notepad next to my keyboard is all I need,” said Nina Rodriguez, an Orlando, Fla.-based recruiter for online travel site Booking.com. “Once I finish the task, I cross it off the list. If it’s something pertinent that I need an alert for, I just plug it into my Google calendar. If I want to keep an electronic note for future reference, I use Notes for Google Drive, which is an extension on my browser and easy to access without having to open a new tab.”

Task management apps like Asana and Trello are also effective, De Pape said. “Pick a tool you’re already comfortable with and be sure it’s something you can keep at your side at all times,” he said. “Avoid software that lives exclusively on your desktop and doesn’t sync between devices.”

De Pape recommended capturing clear, specific information when jotting down tasks. “Assume you’ll forget the details, because you will,” he said.

Block Time

Assign yourself time to accomplish assignments. Mustain uses Calendly, a scheduler app, to block time in her day. “I go in on Fridays and block off meetings and sourcing power hours for the next week,” she said. She uses a planner to set daily goals like “source 20 candidates, do three interviews and submit five people,” she said.

Pylant cautioned recruiters to be realistic when blocking time. “If you underestimate a meeting or task, it will throw off the rest of your blocked time for the day—and sometimes week.” She also recommended adding a floating 30-minute time block each day, which can be parceled out to make up for unexpected but unavoidable time-wasters—like a meeting that goes too long or being stopped in the hallway by a chatty colleague.

Prioritize Tasks

When it comes to prioritizing tasks, solutions range from the simple—Pylant keeps a written list handy and constantly updates and reprioritizes it—to more complex organizational methods.

For each task, Mustain considers where in the process the related requisition lies, the urgency of the task and the stakeholders involved. “If your boss is coming to you with something urgent, that ranks higher than a candidate who needs something on the side that can wait.”

She spends the first hour and the last part of each day reading e-mails and schedules her sourcing time early in the morning. “I can get people responding that same day and that drives my results,” she said. “I’ll target what is the most value-add for my time.”

Mustain also believes in getting the most challenging tasks done early in the workday. “Try to do the things you are most reluctant to do in the morning,” she said. “If you hate calling to decline people, do it in the morning and get it over with or it will hang on you all day.”

It gets tougher to solve problems and complete challenging work later in the day, De Pape agreed. He schedules calls and meetings and does administrative tasks during the “downtime” periods of the day, such as right before breaking for lunch or midafternoon.

Take Breaks

Everyone knows that taking breaks during the workday is important for recharging, but many recruiters find this hard to do. “In my time in recruitment as well as working remotely, I have found myself many times logging in at 8 a.m. and then the next thing I know it is 6 p.m., and I never took a break and sometimes forgot to eat,” Pylant said.

“I schedule a lunch hour on my calendar every day,” Mustain said, even though she admitted that she usually works through it, eating at her desk. “When you are doing anything for over 90 minutes, you need to step away and take some time to clear your mind. Take a walk, grab a cup of coffee or chat with colleagues.”

Take breaks away from your desk or work area when possible. “I like to take a walk at lunch and maybe even a quick walk around the building for a shorter break during the day,” Cugini said. “Hopefully others are breaking at the same time, and we can walk and talk about life outside of work. Workplace friendships have such a big impact on employee engagement, and these walks and talks have proven that to me over and over again.”

Was this article useful? SHRM offers thousands of tools, templates and other exclusive member benefits, including compliance updates, sample policies, HR expert advice, education discounts, a growing online member community and much more. Visit SHRM online.

WORKFACT WEDNESDAY: 82% of Job Seekers Are Frustrated With Automated Recruiting

by Aliah D. Wright for SHRM online

A new report reveals that 82 percent of job seekers are frustrated with an overly automated recruiting experience. It’s especially true for candidates who apply for jobs online and never hear back from potential employers about the status of their applications.

Randstad US, based in Atlanta and one of the largest national staffing and HR service organizations, released the report in August. About 1,200 respondents from the U.S. were surveyed by . While most candidates found value in technology, they said they are frustrated when it supplants the human aspect of the recruiting process.

The report also found:

  • 95 percent said technology should be used to assist the recruiting experience, not replace it.
  • 87 percent said technology has made looking for a job more impersonal.
  • 82 percent said the ideal interaction with a company is one where innovative technologies are used behind the scenes and come second to personal, human interaction.

“The findings reinforce what we’ve believed for quite some time, that successful talent acquisition lies at the intersection of technology and human touch,” said Randstad North America CEO Linda Galipeau. “If done correctly, the right combination of personal interaction with the power of today’s intelligent machines can create an experience that is inherently more human.”

You can read more at SHRM online.

TIP TUESDAY: 7 Words to Delete from Your Cover Letters

Writing a cover letter to pitch your qualifications and your personality in only a few paragraphs is usually the most difficult part of applying for a job. As a general rule of thumb, a cover letter can make or break your likelihood to get called in for an interview.

“Cover letters give you a way to make a first impression and to directly address the key requirements of the position, helping to get you past the initial screening and encouraging the HR officer to read a little deeper,” explains business psychologist and executive career coach Kate Sullivan. “The best cover letters present you as a unique person with valuable skills, telling a story about your background and experience that lets the recruiter immediately envision you fitting into the company culture. It should always be customized to the position and its requirements and should hook your reader in like a great novel.

“The one firm rule for a cover letter is to keep it short: No more than two or three short paragraphs. And don’t revisit every single big job you’ve had, because they can see that on your resume. The cover letter exists purely to distill your achievement and put then in a new light.Take the advice of career experts and coaches who shed light on the type of words you should delete from your cover letter ASAP.