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TIP TUESDAY: 8 Differences You Need to Know About Generation Z vs. Millennials

The next generation hungry to enter the workplace is Generation Z. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, Generation Z (the post-Millennial generation) makes up 25% of the population. (See, Who Is Generation Z? 4 Big Ways They Will Be Different, to learn more.)

Sixty-two percent of Generation Zers anticipate challenges working with Baby Boomers and Generation Xers vs. only 5% who anticipate challenges working with Millennials.

Companies with a firm understanding of the expectations and preferences of the emerging generation will be well-equipped to attract the next generation of talent, maximize their potential, alleviate the inevitable cross-generational challenges, and capitalize on cognitive diversity through a generationally diverse workforce.

Here are eight key differences you need to know:

1. Realistic vs. Optomistic

Seventy-seven percent of Generation Zers expect to work harder than previous generations.

Millennials became optimistic thanks to their encouraging Baby Boomer parents and growing up in a time of prosperity and opportunity. Generation Zers will be realistic thanks to their skeptical and straight-shooting Generation X parents and growing up in a recession. According to Pew Charitable Trusts, during the Great Recession, the median net worth of Generation Z’s parents fell by nearly 45%.

2. Independent vs. Collaborative

Seventy-one percent of Generation Zers said they believe the phrase “if you want it done right, then do it yourself.”

When given the option to arrange a group of desks, Millennials would opt for a collaborative arrangement and assemble the desks into a circle. Generation Z will be more competitive with their colleagues and will harness a do-it-yourself mentality at work. In fact, 69% of Generation Zers would rather have their own work space than share it with someone else.

3. Digital Natives vs. Digital Pioneers

Forty percent of Generation Zers said that working Wi-Fi was more important to them than working bathrooms.

According to Pew Research, only 14% of U.S. adults had access to the Internet in 1995, but by 2014, 87% had access. Millennials were pioneers in the digital age. They witnessed the introduction and rise of social media, instant messaging, smartphones, search engines, and the mobile revolution. Generation Z did not witness these innovations, but rather, they were born into it. Ubiquitous connectivity, highly curated global information, on-demand video, and 24/7 news cycles are native to Generation Z.

4. Private vs. Public

Seventy percent of Generation Zers would rather share personal information with their pet than with their boss.

As digital pioneers, Millennials explored (and in some cases exploited) social media and made public their thoughts, opinions, and every noteworthy or menial life update. With safety and security top of mind, Generation Zers will be much more calculated and/or selective with the information they share online. For example, Generation Z gravitated to Snapchat because of the time-bound content that won’t live online forever like a Tweet or Facebook post would.

5. Face-to-Face vs. Digital Only

Seventy-four percent of Generation Z prefer to communicate face-to-face with colleagues.

Millennials pioneered many of the digital communication tools (e.g., texting, instant messaging, Slack) that have made the workplace more efficient and effective but, some would argue, less personable. Equipped with their experience communicating using full sight, sound, and motion over Skype®, FaceTime, Snapchat, etc., Generation Z is positioned as the ideal generation to finally strike the right balance between online and offline workplace communications.

6. On Demand Learning vs. Formally Educated

Seventy-five percent of Generation Z say there are other ways of getting a good education than by going to college, according to Sparks & Honey.

Millennials are questioning if their large student debt was worth it, especially considering that 44% of recent college grads are employed in jobs not requiring degrees, and one in eight recent college grads are unemployed. Generation Z will explore education alternatives. They will pursue on-demand or just-in-time learning solutions, like how-to YouTube tutorials, or will seek employers that offer robust on-the-job and development training.

6. Role-Hopping vs. Job-Hopping

Seventy-five percent of Generation Z would be interested in a situation in which they could have multiple roles within one place of employment.

Growing up in fast times and coming of age in an on-demand culture, Millennials have little patience for stagnation, especially when it comes to their careers. Generation Z won’t want to miss out on any valuable experience and will want to flex their on-demand learning muscle by trying out various roles or projects (e.g., marketing, accounting, human resources) inside of the organization.

8. Golden Citizen vs. Global Spectator

Fifty-eight percent of adults worldwide aged 35+ agree that “kids today have more in common with their global peers than they do with adults in their own country.”

Millennials were considered the first global generation because they shared similar characteristics and values across borders, and they were able to view significant global events in real time. However, Generation Z interacts with their global peers with greater fluidity than any other generation. As more of the world comes online, geographies will continue to shrink, causing Generation Z to view themselves as global citizens.

Ryan Jenkins is an internationally recognized Millennial and Generation Z keynote speaker, Inc.com columnist, and author of The Millennial Manual: The Complete How-To Guide to Manage, Develop, and Engage Millennials at Work.

THROWBACK THURSDAY: Why Friday the 13th Scares Us

by Brian Handwerk for National Geographic

As if October wasn’t spooky enough, this year the creepiest month also features the return of Friday the 13th.Keep Calm

October 13 is the second ill-fated Friday to fall in 2017. And while January the 13th wasn’t especially sinister, it seems that no matter how many such moments pass us by, the dreaded day continues to inspire unease and fears of misfortune.

There’s no logical reason to fear the occasional coincidence of any day and date. But Friday the 13th can still have noticeable impacts. Sometimes we create them in our own minds—for good and ill.

Believe it or not

Jane Risen, a behavioral scientist at the University of Chicago Booth School of Business, has found that superstitions can influence even nonbelievers. In one study, Risen found that people who identify as superstitious and non-superstitious both believe a bad outcome is more likely when they’ve been jinxed, such as by stating they definitely won’t get into a car accident.

“Generally speaking, I find that this occurs because the bad outcome springs to mind and is imagined more clearly following the jinx,” she explains. “People use the ease of imagining something as a cue to its likelihood.”

This kind of thinking may be more widespread on Friday the 13th: “Even if I don’t actively believe, just that fact that Friday the 13th exists as a known cultural element means that I entertain it as a possibility,” she says. When otherwise unremarkable events occur on that date, we tend to notice.

“That adds a bit more fuel to this intuition, makes it feel a bit more true, even when you recognize that it’s not true.”

In that way, simply being aware of superstitions may help to instill a sense of order in a world of random and uncontrollable worries, according to Rebecca Borah, a professor of English at the University of Cincinnati.

“When you have rules and you know how to play by them, it always seems a lot easier,” she told National Geographic in 2014. On Friday the 13th, “we don’t do anything too scary today, or double-check that there’s enough gas in the car, or whatever it might be.”

Where does a fear of Friday the 13th come from in the first place?

It’s difficult to pin down the origins and evolution of a superstition. It may be rooted in religious beliefs surrounding the 13th guest at the Last Supper—Judas, the apostle said to have betrayed Jesus—and the crucifixion of Jesus on a Friday, which was known as Hangman’s Day. Some biblical scholars also believe Eve tempted Adam with the forbidden fruit on a Friday, and that Abel was slain by his brother Cain on Friday the 13th.

Other experts suspect even older roots for this form of triskaidekaphobia (fear of the number 13). Thomas Fernsler, an associate policy scientist in the Mathematics and Science Education Resource Center at the University of Delaware, said the number 13 suffers because of its position after 12.

Numerologists consider 12 a “complete” number. There are 12 months in a year, 12 signs of the zodiac, 12 gods of Olympus, 12 labors of Hercules, 12 tribes of Israel, and 12 apostles of Jesus.

The number 13’s association with bad luck “has to do with just being a little beyond completeness. “The number becomes restless or squirmy.”

Arbitrary though they may be, superstitions like fears of ladders, black cats, or “unlucky” numbers are incredibly persistent.

“Once they are in the culture, we tend to honor them,” notes Thomas Gilovich, a professor of psychology at Cornell University in Ithaca, New York. “You feel like if you are going to ignore it, you are tempting fate.”

Many people really do act differently on Friday the 13th. They may refuse to travel, buy a house, or act on a hot stock tip, and these inactions can noticeably slow economic activity, according to the late Donald Dossey, a folklore historian and founder of the Stress Management Center and Phobia Institute.

“It’s been estimated that $800 or $900 million is lost in business on this day, because people will not fly or do business they normally would do,” he said.

Soon enough, this Friday the 13th will end, and even the most superstitious among us can rest easy—at least until April 13, 2018.

WORKFACT WEDNESDAY: Is the 9-to-5 Job Done?

U.S. Workers Look to Innovative Ways of Working

New research, released by ManpowerGroup, reveals a new era of work in which flexibility and balance are in and the traditional “9-to-5 job for life” is out.  Findings from the report “#GigResponsibly: The Rise of NextGen Work”—a global survey of 9,500 people in 12 countries—identifies a shift towards new ways of getting work done, that works for people and business.

ManpowerGroup asked people how they want to work, what motivates them and their views on NextGen Work—part-time, freelance, contract, temporary, or independent contract work.  More control over their schedule (42%), boosting their bank account (41%), and developing new skills (38%) are top reasons why NextGen Work is on the rise.  More than 80% of U.S. workers say NextGen Work is a choice, not a last resort, and builds resilience for less predictable futures.

“The U.S. labor market is fundamentally changing. We’re seeing a growing number of people opting for alternative models over traditional roles. They want flexible careers, the opportunity to develop new skills and to be able to blend work and home more easily,” said Becky Frankiewicz, President, ManpowerGroup North America—in a press release. “At the same time, companies want workforce solutions that find them the best talent when business models and skills needs are changing faster than ever. That’s why NextGen Work is on the rise.”

The vast majority of workers (94%), spanning five generations and both genders, are open to NextGen Work for their next or future position, but their motives vary.

  • Men are slightly more likely than women to look for flexibility to spend time with family (32% vs. 29%) and to seek a less stressful environment (30% vs. 27%).
  • Younger Millennials (ages 18 to 24) and Baby Boomers (ages 50 to 65) prioritize the same things: pay (60% vs. 65%) and work/life balance (48% vs. 64%). Engaging in work that is meaningful to them is also a priority for both generations.
  • Conversely, appetite for learning peaks among older Millennials and declines with age.

NextGen Work is a global phenomenon. Emerging markets like India and Mexico are leading the way with the greatest openness to freelance, contract, temporary, or independent contract work (97%), with mature markets—including the U.S. (94%), with the United Kindom and Australia—close behind (90% and 92% respectively). Germany, Netherlands, and Japan are more resistant to NextGen Work.

TIP TUESDAY: 5 Lies to Watch For When Hiring

A survey from Right Management reports that the cost of a bad hire can range from one to five times the salary of the individual. According to background screening leader HireRight, job seekers very often exaggerate, falsify credentials and outright lie on their job applications, especially in today’s competitive job market.

Thus, the chances of hiring the wrong person escalate. The prevalence of candidates lying on job applications and resumes, if not outright fraud, at the very least provides reason for small businesses to conduct comprehensive background checks.

Here are five of the most popular lies told by job candidates that employers should watch out for:

1. Exaggerating dates of past employment

As many as 34 percent of all resumes include discrepancies related to previous employment. Candidates often stretch the truth to cover gaps in their work history they may not want to explain — like the job seeker who extended his employment dates to cover a six month jail sentence! Sometimes discrepancies are honest mistakes, but employers should always verify employment dates.

2. Falsifying the degree or credential earned

There is roughly a 20 percent discrepancy rate in education qualifications provided by candidates. Often a resume will tout a degree when a candidate only took some classes, or exaggerate a major so the candidate appears more qualified for the job. Other candidates forge diplomas, claim degrees earned by family members or purchase degrees from diploma mills. The latter can be very difficult to identify, but knowledgeable background checking firms compile detailed databases of known diploma mills so frauds can be identified.

3. Inflating salary or title

It’s hardly surprising that a candidate might exaggerate these important facts to get a better job or a higher salary. That’s why companies typically contact previous employers to verify positions held by the candidate. Salary verification can be more difficult since many companies will not reveal this information. In such cases, asking the candidate for previous W-2 forms as proof is a wise step.

4. Concealing a criminal record

The most serious reason companies must perform background checks is to maintain a safe workplace. Roughly 11 percent of all background checks return a criminal record. Disturbingly, criminals are most attracted to companies where they know they will not be checked, therefore smaller businesses may be a target. Criminal applicants often try to avoid detection through nondisclosure or by changing details such as the spelling of their names or dates of birth.

5. Hiding a drug habit

Since 42 percent of Americans admit to using an illegal drug in their lifetime, screening candidates for drug use is a wise idea for small businesses. Drug users go to great lengths to beat these tests — such as adulterating urine samples — but today’s drug tests are increasingly sophisticated and can identify true positives and negatives despite the attempts of those trying to cover up drug use.

{by John Reese, HireRight, as featured in business know-how online}

THROWBACK THURSDAY: World’s Biggest Coffee Break

On October 5, 1996, history’s biggest coffee break occurred when 513,659 people drank coffee simultaneously in 14,652 groups, offices and other gatherings throughout the UK. The event raised $28,460,000 or £21,690,420 for the Macmillan Cancer Relief charity.

The first Coffee Morning took place in 1990. It was a rather small affair with a simple idea: guests would gather over coffee and donate the cost of their cup to Macmillan. It was so effective, they did it again the next year – but this time nationally. Since then, Coffee Morning has raised over £165.5 million (nearly $214,000,000 in US dollars) for Macmillan.

The World’s Biggest Coffee Morning is Macmillan’s biggest fundraising event for people facing cancer. Macmillan asks people all over the UK to host their own Coffee Mornings and donations on the day are made to Macmillan. Last year alone, java drinkers raised £29.5 million ($387,069,500 U.S.).